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The Year of the Civil War

Follow the misadventures of two best friends as they devote a year of their post-collegiate lives to discovering the Civil War.

As previously highlighted on this blog, I’m bringing back the Scorpy comics.  This week, Scorpy and Ante follow the war from Fort Sumter to Appomattox, all in five days!

As previously highlighted on this blog, I’m bringing back the Scorpy comics. This week, Scorpy and Ante follow the war from Fort Sumter to Appomattox, all in five days!

File under: Things that I find mildly entertaining

“The Political Quadrille, Music by Dred Scott” satirized the four candidates for president in 1860, along with their supporters. Lower left: Northern Democrat Stephen A. Douglas dancing with an Irishman. Upper left: Southern Democrat John C. Breckinridge arm in arm with retiring president James Buchanan, who was nicknamed “the Buck.” Lower right: Constitutional Union Party nominee John Bell mixes it up with a Native American. Upper right: Republican Abraham Lincoln steps to it with an African-American slave. Middle: Dred Scott plays the tune to which all must dance.
—Image Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division

Most people, myself included, generally think only of Stephen Douglas when it comes to challengers to Lincoln in his accession to the presidency but it was actually John C. Breckinridge who came in second to the man in the stovepipe hat.  The photo links to a great article that outlines the politics behind the election that set the motions of the Civil War into action.

[Click the cartoon for the fantastic full-length article on the election of 1860.]

“The Political Quadrille, Music by Dred Scott” satirized the four candidates for president in 1860, along with their supporters. Lower left: Northern Democrat Stephen A. Douglas dancing with an Irishman. Upper left: Southern Democrat John C. Breckinridge arm in arm with retiring president James Buchanan, who was nicknamed “the Buck.” Lower right: Constitutional Union Party nominee John Bell mixes it up with a Native American. Upper right: Republican Abraham Lincoln steps to it with an African-American slave. Middle: Dred Scott plays the tune to which all must dance. —Image Courtesy of Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division

Most people, myself included, generally think only of Stephen Douglas when it comes to challengers to Lincoln in his accession to the presidency but it was actually John C. Breckinridge who came in second to the man in the stovepipe hat. The photo links to a great article that outlines the politics behind the election that set the motions of the Civil War into action.

[Click the cartoon for the fantastic full-length article on the election of 1860.]

Teen with his family:(reading brochure) ‘Wait a second, it said it [Lincoln’s assassination] changed American history…didn’t it make American history? How could it change the past?’

—In line at Ford’s Theatre (via Overheard in DC)

I have been neglectful of this blog, yet again, but a dear colleague sent this along and I thought it was relevant, given the discussion regarding the role slavery played in the Civil War.

During this Memorial Day weekend, take a moment to remember all those who have died in service to our country - and enjoy some grilled meats :)

civilwar150:

John Wilkes Booth

In 1865, a single photograph was taken during the autopsy of John Wilkes Booth. Where is it now?

The administration, led by Secretary of War Edwin Stanton, ordered that a single photograph be taken of Booth’s corpse, says Bob Zeller, president of the Center for Civil War…

(via civilwar150)

This concludes the first series of Scorpy Comics on The Civil War.  I’ll be posting the second series sometime in June and the Reconstruction series later in the year.  Be sure to click through for more on Scorpy Bug!

This concludes the first series of Scorpy Comics on The Civil War. I’ll be posting the second series sometime in June and the Reconstruction series later in the year. Be sure to click through for more on Scorpy Bug!

Scorpy first meets Lincoln - love it!

Scorpy first meets Lincoln - love it!

As previously highlighted on this blog, I think its interesting (and bold) that the comics, which reflect the Virginia Standards of Learning, highlight slavery as the primary cause for war.

As previously highlighted on this blog, I think its interesting (and bold) that the comics, which reflect the Virginia Standards of Learning, highlight slavery as the primary cause for war.

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